4 South East Asian Treks You’d Be Mad To Miss!

To most people the concept of trekking brings to mind images of imposing snowy mountains conquered by hard-core climbers. At AdventureHoney we have a different concept of trekking. You don’t need to be Bear Grylls to conquer a mountain. All you need is a little determination and a healthy thirst for adventure.

There’s a tonne of great treks in South East Asia. Here’s the top 4 you’d be mad to miss!

Mt Kinabalu, Borneo

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At 4095m above sea level Kinabalu is the highest climbable mountain in South East Asia. The “Holy Grail” for climbers in this part of the world, there is one thing everyone notices when they are standing at the bottom; its big, really freaking big. Luckily, even the most novice trekkers can tackle the mountain with no real mountain climbing mountain gear needed. All you need is a sturdy pair of shoes and some warm clothes because boy does it get cold up there. And I don’t mean “It’s a little chilly out there, wear a sweater”, I mean “Holy crap, I cant feel my fingers and toes.” However cold it may get, the sunrise from the peak of Kinabalu makes it worth while. On a clear day climbers can see the neighbouring Philippines and the stunning moonscape rock-face makes for a mesmerising descent.

Doi Inthanon, Thailand

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Most travellers are baffled when they discover that hiking Thailand’s largest mountain can be knocked over in just one day. Such is the wonder of the Doi Inthanon trekking experience. At 2,565m above sea level what Doi Inthanon lacks in size it makes up for in experience. Abundant wildlife, amazing waterfalls and colourful locals are just a few of the joys when trekking through this national park. AdventureHoney offers a Doi Inthanon tour that includes hotel transfers, water, lunch and an English speaking guide. If you’re on the lookout for the one of the best treks in Thailand, you can’t go past Doi Inthanon.

Mount Rinjani, Lombok

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Towering over the small Indonesian Island of Lombok, Rinjani is a breathtaking climb, literally. A Rinjani trek usually takes 3-4 days and includes a visit to the hot springs, the beautiful Lake RInjani and a sunrise view from the summit. There is no accommodation on the mountain so climbers are required to camp. Tour operators also tend to be wary of trekkers fitness before they embark so it’s a good idea to be in reasonable shape and injury free. Despite the rough conditions the climb is a trip highlight for anybody who does it. The experience is perhaps best summed up by one Lombok local who insisted, “Rinjani is the most beautiful and rewarding thing in the world. Ever”.

100 Waterfalls Trek, Laos

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The 100 Waterfalls Trek is one of Laos’s best-kept secrets. For years the locals have used it as a direct route between the many settlements of the Nam Ou valley but tourists have only frequented the trail since 2009. This should be a calling card for travellers to get in soon before the area inevitably becomes over developed and the tour buses begin stopping by. Located just outside of the character filled tourist town of Luang Prabang, the trek can usually be completed within a day and is an awesome taste of the renowned Lao wilderness.

What’s your favourite trek in South East Asia?

6 responses to “4 South East Asian Treks You’d Be Mad To Miss!

  1. I’d also be mad if I visited the country and missed these beautiful attractions. Laos and Cambodia are the two countries I’d like to visit next year. Thanks for the info.

  2. Nice post! We are going to south asia this summer and we do not know where to go. We have been to thailand and we want to experience something new. Our dilemma is between laos, cambodia, vietnam or myanmar.. any recommendation?

  3. Pingback: 5 Essentials for Any Trekking Adventure | Jeff Schneider·

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